2020 Dodge Challenger SRT Super Stock Will Cost About $100 Per Horsepower | News

2020 Dodge Challenger SRT Super Stock

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Dodge’s latest factory-stock drag-strip monster might not be quite as bonkers as a Demon, but the good news is that the 2020 Challenger SRT Super Stock won’t cost as much, either. The Super Stock will cost $81,090 (including a $1,495 destination fee). That’s just over $100 for each of the Super Stock’s 807 horsepower before a likely gas-guzzler tax, though since we yet don’t have EPA fuel economy ratings for it, we can’t tell you exactly how our calculation is affected.

Related: 2020 Dodge Challenger Super Stock: It’s No Demon, But It’s No Slouch, Either

In exchange for that much cash, you’ll get a Challenger that Dodge says can sprint from 0-60 mph in 3.25 seconds and complete the quarter-mile in 10.5 seconds. Besides the 807-hp V-8 (up from 797 in the Hellcat Redeye), the Super Stock comes with sticky Nitto-brand drag radial tires, a unique Bilstein-brand suspension, unique lightweight 18-inch wheels, a “performance-tuned” limited-slip differential and a standard eight-speed automatic transmission with a 3.09 final drive gear.

The tires are one of the key components contributing to the Super Stock’s quickness, according to a statement from Dodge chief Tim Kuniskis.

“There are a million jokes about bright colors, loud exhausts and racing stripes that make your car faster, but there is one sure thing — your car is only as fast as your tires,” Kuniskis said in a statement. “The 2020 Challenger SRT Super Stock gives our weekend warriors the ability to upgrade to 18-inch drag radials without having to spend a ton of money on changing out brakes and suspension components.”

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If a car that can do a 10-second quarter-mile straight from the showroom floor is your cup of tea, orders for the 2020 Super Stock open later in August — and unlike the Demon, the Super Stock will carry over into at least the next model year, so you don’t have to act immediately to grab one.

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