2021 Genesis G80, GV80 Delayed by Coronavirus | News

2021 Genesis GV80

Cars.com photo by Christian Lantry

Citing delays due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Genesis says its redesigned G80 sedan and all-new GV80 SUV won’t hit dealerships until the fall, later than initially promised. The luxury brand, launched by Hyundai in late 2015, said early this year that the new GV80 — its first SUV — would go on sale in the summer. When Genesis unveiled the redesigned G80 in March, it targeted a North American on-sale date in the second half of the year.

Related: 2021 Genesis GV80: Well Worth the Wait

Now Genesis says both models — still slated for the 2021 model year — will arrive late.

“Earlier this year, we announced that sales for both vehicles would commence in the U.S. market in the summer of 2020,” Genesis said in a July 23 statement. “Unfortunately, due to COVID-19-related delays in the U.S., we need to adjust our communication of the timing for their highly anticipated arrival in the U.S. market to the fall of 2020.”

It isn’t the first time automakers have pushed back arrival dates or even canceled cars entirely amid the global pandemic and its economic fallout. In April, Lincoln reportedly scrapped plans to jointly develop an all-electric SUV with Rivian, an upstart electric automaker that also had to reportedly delay its own production plans. In February and early March, Chevrolet announced mid-cycle updates to its popular Equinox and Traverse SUVs, both for the 2021 model year. Now, GM’s mass-market brand has pushed both back to the 2022 model year.

Asked for more specific timing within the fall, a Genesis spokesperson did not immediately respond. The G80 slots between the G70, a compact sports sedan introduced for 2019 that won Cars.com’s top accolade for the model year, and the G90, a full-size flagship sedan with substantial updates for 2020. The GV80, meanwhile, is Genesis’ first SUV.

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