2021 Subaru Crosstrek’s New Sport Model, New Engine, Same-ish Starting Price | News

2021 Subaru Crosstrek

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Subaru announced its 2021 Crosstrek would receive a new Sport trim level, a new 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine for the Sport and Limited trims, as well as some styling tweaks and enhanced safety features. Now it’s clear those updates won’t come at a significant added cost.

Related: 2021 Subaru Crosstrek Adds New Engine, Sport Trim, Driver Assistance

Base and Premium model prices increase by $140, while the Limited model will increase in price by $640 (the destination fee for all 2021 Crosstreks is $1,050, an increase of $40 over the 2020’s). Here’s the full list of starting prices, including destination:

  • Base trim with a six-speed manual transmission: $23,295
  • Base, continuously variable automatic: $24,645
  • Premium, six-speed manual: $24,345
  • Premium, CVT: $25,695
  • Sport, CVT: $27,545
  • Limited: CVT: $29,045

As you may notice, Sport and Limited models come with the CVT as standard equipment, while Base and Premium trims charge a $1,350 premium to switch from the manual.

Beyond that, options for the Crosstrek are included in various packages. CVT-equipped Premium models can add a moonroof, blind spot detection with rear cross-traffic alert, keyless entry with push-button start and a power driver’s seat for $1,995 (on top of the $1,350 for the CVT). Sport models can add all of the former except the power driver’s seat, as well as an 8-inch infotainment display, for $1,600. Limited models have two options: a stand-alone moonroof for $1,000 or the moonroof, built-in navigation and a Harman Kardon premium audio system for $2,395.

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The starting price for the 2021 Subaru Crosstrek is more than 2020 versions of the Honda HR-V and Hyundai Kona, and slightly less than the 2020 Jeep Renegade — but unlike all of those models, the Crosstrek also offers standard all-wheel drive.

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